Read Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You Think by Hans Rosling Online

Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You Think

Factfulness: The stress-reducing habit of only carrying opinions for which you have strong supporting facts.When asked simple questions about global trendswhat percentage of the worlds population live in poverty; why the worlds population is increasing; how many girls finish schoolwe systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess teachers, journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers.In Factfulness, Professor of International Health and global TED phenomenon Hans Rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators, Anna and Ola, offers a radical new explanation of why this happens. They reveal the ten instincts that distort our perspectivefrom our tendency to divide the world into two camps (usually some version of us and them) to the way we consume media (where fear rules) to how we perceive progress (believing that most things are getting worse).Our problem is that we dont know what we dont know, and e...

Title : Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You Think
Author :
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ISBN : 9781473637467
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 342 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You Think Reviews

  • Michael Perkins

    “I really do believe that our attitudes are shaped much more by our social groups than they are by facts on the ground. We are not great reasoners. Most people don't like to think at all, or like to think as little as possible. And by most, I mean roughly 70 percent of the population. Even the rest seem to devote a lot of their resources to justifying beliefs that they want to hold, as opposed to forming credible beliefs based only on fact.”

    ― Steven Sloman, The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never T
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  • Betsy

    I have mixed feelings about this book. Sometimes it made me angry, seeming to be very preachy and self-important. "Everything you do and are now is wrong and here's why." When someone comes at me with that kind of message, I tend to get very defensive. But I always kept reading because what he says makes so much sense. So much of what we think we know about the world is just wrong or at least badly slanted. But to truly effect change in the world we need to be able to deal with it as it truly is ...more

  • Tom LA

    I knew I would have enjoyed Factfulness but it’s even better than I thought.

    Rosling sounds a bit like Steven Pinker but without all the philosophical and historical bias that ruins Pinker’s books.

    The core message though is the same: the world is getting better, not worse. This is NOT a half-glass-full view. In fact, Rosling repeats over and over that he does not see himself as an optimist. Rather, he wants to help people see the world through data and facts.

    Given my hate for the distortion of
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  • Daniel Clausen

    This is probably one of the most important books available today. Why? Because our world is desperately in need of a shared sense of reality, and it's very important that this reality has a solid grounding in science and reason. The book is not without its controversy. The charts and graphs mostly come from UN and World Bank statistics. Many people will argue about the "factfulness" of the various datasets presented in this book-- after all, your faith in the science and facts of these books als ...more

  • Mats Mehrstedt

    In the last decades of his life Hans Rosling (1948 – 2017) made a world-wide career lecturing to large corporations, Wall Street bankers, hedge fund managers and gatherings of Nobel laureates and heads of states such as in Davos, about the statistics of the world. Roslings son invented a software so that you could present statistics with moving, shrinking and growing bubbles in different colors, which made an otherwise boring subject highly entertaining. The program could even be sold to Google. ...more

  • David

    This is a fascinating book about how we think about the world, and many of the ways in which we think incorrectly. To start off, the reader is encouraged to take the Factfulness quiz. It consists of thirteen multiple-choice questions. Most people do worse than pure chance, i.e., a chimpanzee could achieve a better score! It goes to show how our thinking about the world is stereotypical, and not in accordance with the world as it really is.

    This book has much in common with a couple of books by St
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  • Scott

    This book came highly recommended by The Economist, amongst others, though to me it was unsurprising, lacked particularly interesting conclusions, and felt rather tedious.

    The work begins with a quiz consisting of 13 questions. The author claims that a 2017 study asked the same questions to 20k participants, and on average respondents got a mere 2 of the first 12 questions right, with one participant of 20k getting 11 of the 12 correct. However, my own results showed 10 / 13, and when I shared t
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  • Apoorva

    Factfulness is written by Hans Rosling, a doctor, a researcher, and a lecturer in global health along with his son Ola and daughter-in-law Anna Rosling, both of whom were responsible for compiling the data. The data is presented in the form of bubble charts, graphs and it’s verified by international organizations.

    The aim of the book is to fight ignorance and dramatic worldview with well-researched facts and global statistics. This book starts off with a quick 13 question quiz to test how you see
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