Read Pachinko by Min Jin Lee Online

Pachinko

Yeongdo, Korea 1911. In a small fishing village on the banks of the East Sea, a club-footed, cleft-lipped man marries a fifteen-year-old girl. The couple have one child, their beloved daughter Sunja. When Sunja falls pregnant by a married yakuza, the family face ruin. But then Isak, a Christian minister, offers her a chance of salvation: a new life in Japan as his wife. Following a man she barely knows to a hostile country in which she has no friends, no home, and whose language she cannot speak, Sunjas salvation is just the beginning of her story. Through eight decades and four generations, Pachinko is an epic tale of family, identity, love, death and survival. ...

Title : Pachinko
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 34051011
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 496 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Pachinko Reviews

  • Thomas

    One of the most brilliant and heartbreaking books I have ever read, I would like to thank Min Jin Lee for writing Pachinko and starting my 2018 with this splendid saga. Pachinko follows four generations of a Korean family who move to Japan amidst Japanese colonization and political warfare. The novel starts with Sunja, the beloved daughter of a poor yet well-respected family, whose unplanned pregnancy has the potential to bring great shame upon her life. After she learns that the baby's father a ...more

  • Elyse

    A very enjoyable lengthy historical fiction! *A Jewel*!!!!!

    Some days Sunja, daughter of the owner of a boardinghouse in Korea, felt chills when she was growing her secret child. If she had agreed to remain the mistress of the rich man in Japan whom she got pregnant with - who was married with 3 children -- she could have been taken care of - and the needs for her child would be met. However - Sunja couldn't agree to the arrangement. She couldn't imagine sharing her life with a man who has anothe
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  • Angela M

    One of the things I like about reading well written historical fiction is that it can take me to another time and place and can be a profound learning experience. I knew close to nothing about the Japanese occupation of Korea from 1910 through WWII. Last year I read Tiger Pelt which introduced me to this time in Korea which was horrific in so many ways for the Koreans. While this novel begins in a village in Korea, most of the story takes place in various places in Japan, but this is a Korean st ...more

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)

    I picked this from Book of the Month last year, and then my in-person book club voted to read it in the 2017-18 season. Since we aren't reading it until June, I was going to wait, but then saw the author would be coming to my town on February 5, and I wanted to go see her read and get my book signed. Then it was included in the shortlist for the Tournament of Books, so basically I needed to read it. It also counts for the Reading Women challenge, as a book on their 2017 shortlist. This checks a ...more

  • Cheri

    !! NOW AVAILABLE !!

    3.5 Stars rounded up

    Pachinko is a sweeping family saga listed as being for readers of The Kite Runner and Cutting for Stone.

    Following one Korean family through the years from Yeongdo, Busan, Korea where a poor fisherman and his wife give birth to a young infant boy. Hoonie, their only child of four to survive, was born with a cleft palate and a twisted foot, in addition to a pleasant temperament and broad shoulders.

    The year Hoonie turns 27, 1910, Japan annexed Korea. His par
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  • Lori

    Feel like I’ve just read two separate books. I really enjoyed the first half, but not so much the second. The timespan this novel encompasses includes several generations of characters, however, I only really felt connected to the ones from the first part and I missed them in the second. Not crazy about the title & think a better one could’ve work better at representing the subject. I did love learning more about Korea and its resilient heritage. Overall, a good novel. 3.5 stars rounding up ...more

  • Rebecca Foster

    Although some of the central events of the novel, like World War II and the atomic bomb drop at Nagasaki, are familiar territory for fiction, Lee prioritizes out-of-the-ordinary perspectives: her Korean characters are first the colonized, and then the outsiders trying to thrive in a foreign country despite segregation and persecution. I recommend Pachinko to readers of family sagas and anyone who wants to learn more about the Korean experience. My only caveat is that the book goes downhill in Pa ...more

  • Liz



    I had this in my TBR queue for ages. It took making it a book club selection to bring it to the front of the line. It’s described as an epic tale of generations of Koreans in Japan and epic truly describes it. I felt like I was reading one of James Michener’s sagas.

    I loved Sunja. She is just so strong. She’s not only part of the underclass, but a woman to boot. She struggles but always finds a way to persevere.

    There is nothing better than a well done historical fiction. This one fits the bill.
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