Read Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari Online

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow

Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed New York Times bestseller and international phenomenon Sapiens, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanitys future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods.Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark stylethorough, yet rivetingfamine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda.What then will replace fa...

Title : Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 31138556
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 450 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow Reviews

  • Elena

    Awesome. This book, as the previous one by this author, goes directly to the shelf of my favourites.

    Some quotes.

    "Unlike the narrating self that controls us today, Google will not make decisions on the basis of cooked-up stories, and will not be misled by cognitive short cuts and the peak-end rule. Google will actually remember every step we took and every hand we shook."

    "In exchange for such devoted counselling services, we will just have to give up the idea that humans are individuals, and th
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  • Helen 2.0

    Obviously I need to get a copy of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind because I loved this book. I can't claim to be well-read in the topic of Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, so I'm definitely biased in my opinion that Harari is a genius. Every few pages my copy has lengthy passages highlighted, brilliant bits I just knew I would want to reference when I pitched this book to family and friends later on.

    In Homo Deus, Harari holds that now that humanity has all but solved the mammoth pr

    Even if bad comes to worse and science cannot hold off the deluge, engineers could still build a hi-tech Noah's Ark for the upper caste, while leaving billions of others to drown. The belief in this hi-tech Ark is currently one of the biggest threats to the future of humankind and of the entire ecosystem. People who believe in the hi-tech Ark should not be put in charge of the global ecology, for the same reason that people who belive in a heavenly afterlife should not be given nuclear weapons.
    Touché.

    And one of the best "food for thought" snippets, in a chapter discussing (among other things) the moral implications of farming animals:
    If and when computer programs attain superhuman intelligence and unprecedented power, should we begin valuing these programs more than we value humans? Would it be okay, for example, for an artificial intelligence to exploit humans and even kill them to further its own needs and desires? If it should never be allowed to do that, despite its superior intelligence and power, why is it ethical for humans to exploit and kill pigs?


    All that being said, the book does have a tendency to ramble a bit. Harari hammers his main points into the reader through numerous repetitions and returns. There are 50 page chapters in Homo Deus, elaborating on and illustrating one single-sentence argument. However, lots of the evidence the author presents is interesting in itself - often it was a historical case applicable to current events - so it never gets boring. ...more

  • Tudor Vlad

    I’ve only read one other book written by Yuval Noah Harari and that was Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, this follows in the steps of that to the point that it seems more like a sequel even if they can be read in whatever order you wish. Just as Sapiens, Homo Deus is a gripping book, I love Yuval’s writing style because it never bores me, he always manages to draw my full attention.

    Homo Deus is a book that wants to present the possible roads that the future might lead us to. It’s not a pr
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  • Nir

    Harari is a fantastic historian: he writes effortlessly and fascinatingly about historic trends, and has a great big picture perspective of the revolutions and contexts of historical progression.

    Harari, however, is not a good futurologist and an absolutely terrible cognitive scientist. Being educated in Cognitive Science and technology myself, all I can say, with the utmost respect I can offer to a fellow Israeli, is that he's full of shit.

    Homo Deus is an attempt to make a sequel to the wildly p
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  • Riku Sayuj

    Homo Obsoletus

    The audacious first act, Sapiens, ended with a wild and apocalyptic prophesy - that the Sapiens were cooking up the next epochal revolution that will overshadow the previous three: the cognitive, agricultural and scientific/industrial revolutions. Home Deus, the second act, is the full exploration of that prophesy.

    Both Sapiens and Homo Deus are compulsory reading in my book, even though the macro-history presented is plenty vulnerable to all sorts of attacks. But then, it might be
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  • Ram

    Now that the Human kind, in the 20th century, has managed to control famine, plague and war, it is ready for it's next challenge.

    According to Yuval Noah Harari, the main reason that humans have managed to attain such a strong position in this planet is their ability to believe in "imaginary orders" such as countries, religion, money etc.

    Many believe that we have something in us that could be called a soul or consciousness or similar but it is not clear that this exists and our behavior could po
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  • Bharath Ramakrishnan

    Having read Sapiens, I had some idea that there would be new themes which Yuval Noah Harari would cover which nobody else has before. With Sapiens, it was about the agricultural revolution and the binding power of stories. And yes - there are brilliant new themes in Homo Deus as well - our delusion of free will and the Sapiens in a future world ruled by algorithms, and it continues excellently from where Sapiens left off. If Sapiens was about how the most powerful species consolidated it's power ...more

  • Manuel Antão

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

    Reiterated Popperian Non-Fiction: "Homo Deus - A Brief History of Tomorrow" by Yuval Noah Harari

    When I was little, I believed (sort of) that Santa Claus existed. It was a working hypothesis that worked, and I didn't look behind it until it became untenable. Now I effectively assume my continuing identity as a person - because that works, sort of, too. In me, and most people I know, the baton of consciousness, of awareness of one's I-ne
    ...more