Read Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari Online

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow

Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed New York Times bestseller and international phenomenon Sapiens, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanitys future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods.Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark stylethorough, yet rivetingfamine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda.What then will replace fa...

Title : Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow
Author :
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ISBN : 31138556
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 450 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow Reviews

  • Safat

    We are not so taken aback when we hear computer programs can beat human chess masters. After all, computers are far more efficient calculators than humans, and chess can be broken down to calculations (In fact, nowadays chess masters don't stand a chance against present day computer Chessmaster programs. It's simply not possible for a human mind to beat them). And we're also not at all shocked when Google and Tesla present us automated cars driven by computer programs. Nevertheless, we reason,co ...more

  • Linh

    Tương lai của con người ra sao: siêu nhân, á thánh dưới dạng những con người gắn chíp, có thể tái tạo và gần như là bất tử, hay con người sẽ chỉ là nô lệ cho Dữ liệu giáo (Dataism), bị vứt đi, vặt vãnh trong quá trình xây dựng một hệ thốn thông tin kết nối mọi thứ?

    Con người là gì? Là một cá thể, có ý chí hoặc linh hồn riêng, hay chỉ là một tập hợp những mớ hổn đỗn các algorithm khác nhau, mâu thuẫn nhau, tự làm hòa với nhau, và cái gọi là tự do ý chí (free will) chỉ là một ảo giác? Và nếu như qu
    ...more

  • Nir

    Harari is a fantastic historian: he writes effortlessly and fascinatingly about historic trends, and has a great big picture perspective of the revolutions and contexts of historical progression.

    Harari, however, is not a good futurologist and an absolutely terrible cognitive scientist. Being educated in Cognitive Science and technology myself, all I can say, with the utmost respect I can offer to a fellow Israeli, is that he's full of shit.

    Homo Deus is an attempt to make a sequel to the wildly p
    ...more

  • Tanja Berg

    "Looking back, many think that the downfall of the pharaohs and the death of God were both positive developments. People are usually afraid of change because they fear the unknown. But the single greatest constant of history is that everything changes."

    Knowing where we are is a prerequisite for having any idea of where we are going. Common fantasies is what put humans on top. Not only can we communicate, but we can also comminuticate about thing that exist only in our common imagination, such as
    ...more

  • Ray

    This book is sure to give one a lot to think about.

    Firstly, I’d highly recommend reading Harari’s seminal Sapiens book before delving into Homo Deus. They are meant to complement each other in order to better understand humanity’s past and future. Much of Homo Deus repeats the previous themes, which is a bit of a flaw, and frames human historical patterns into broad categories which can seem rushed if one didn’t read Sapiens already. Still, the concepts are so important and take much energy to t
    ...more

  • Brian Yahn

    Sapiens was a great book in that it explained, briefly, what you need to know to understand humans today.

    Homo Deus attempts to do the same thing, but for the future. It let's you know the important technical advances that could have huge implications to society: specifically technologies that could end liberalism, humanism, and capitalism.

    It's hard to imagine a current world without one of those things. But in the not-to-distant future, all three of them could be gone.

    Harari makes the case that
    ...more

  • Helen 2.0

    Obviously I need to get a copy of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind because I loved this book. I can't claim to be well-read in the topic of Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, so I'm definitely biased in my opinion that Harari is a genius. Every few pages my copy has lengthy passages highlighted, brilliant bits I just knew I would want to reference when I pitched this book to family and friends later on.

    In Homo Deus, Harari holds that now that humanity has all but solved the mammoth pr

    Even if bad comes to worse and science cannot hold off the deluge, engineers could still build a hi-tech Noah's Ark for the upper caste, while leaving billions of others to drown. The belief in this hi-tech Ark is currently one of the biggest threats to the future of humankind and of the entire ecosystem. People who believe in the hi-tech Ark should not be put in charge of the global ecology, for the same reason that people who belive in a heavenly afterlife should not be given nuclear weapons.
    Touché.

    And one of the best "food for thought" snippets, in a chapter discussing (among other things) the moral implications of farming animals:
    If and when computer programs attain superhuman intelligence and unprecedented power, should we begin valuing these programs more than we value humans? Would it be okay, for example, for an artificial intelligence to exploit humans and even kill them to further its own needs and desires? If it should never be allowed to do that, despite its superior intelligence and power, why is it ethical for humans to exploit and kill pigs?


    All that being said, the book does have a tendency to ramble a bit. Harari hammers his main points into the reader through numerous repetitions and returns. There are 50 page chapters in Homo Deus, elaborating on and illustrating one single-sentence argument. However, lots of the evidence the author presents is interesting in itself - often it was a historical case applicable to current events - so it never gets boring. ...more

  • Bharath Ramakrishnan

    Having read Sapiens, I had some idea that there would be new themes which Yuval Noah Harari would cover which nobody else has before. With Sapiens, it was about the agricultural revolution and the binding power of stories. And yes - there are brilliant new themes in Homo Deus as well - our delusion of free will and the Sapiens in a future world ruled by algorithms, and it continues excellently from where Sapiens left off. If Sapiens was about how the most powerful species consolidated it's power ...more