Read Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki Online

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism

Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert; hes just a regular guy who was stressed at work, insecure, and constantly comparing himself to othersuntil one day he decided to change his life by reducing his possessions to the bare minimum. The benefits were instantaneous and absolutely remarkable: without all his stuff, Sasaki finally felt true freedom, peace of mind, and appreciation for the present moment.Goodbye, Things explores why we measure our worth by the things we own and how the new minimalist movement will not only transform your space but truly enrich your life. Along the way, Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering tips on the minimizing process and revealing the profound ways he has changed since he got rid of everything he didnt need. The benefits of a minimalist life can be realized by anyone, and Sasakis humble vision of true happiness will open your eyes to minimalisms potential....

Title : Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780393609035
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 288 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism Reviews

  • 7jane

    I've read a couple of books on minimalist lifestyle, and this is one of the best in my opinion. I especially like that all the photos included with the book are at the start, helps to make the book appealing. You can see from them not only single persons, but also a couple, a family and a traveling person's backpack contents (though only scarf can be counted as clothes in it, which leaves me wondering about the rest of the clothes that could be there).

    This includes the author's own pictures and
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  • Kathryn

    Fumio Sasaki takes minimalism to an entirely new level. I could not live in such a fundamental environment. I need beauty and plant life; my home is my sanctuary, not just a place to sleep. This lifestyle works for him and others, I am sure, but just not for me. I much prefer William Morris's quote "Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."

  • Alice

    I received an advanced copy from Goodreads, and was, to be honest, skeptical at first. Hasn't Marie Kondo already turned the minimalism trend around? Sasaki's book is his own, however. He is a humble and honest guide throughout the book. Sasaki offers insights on minimalism through his own mind and life. I really enjoyed reading the book. It felt very cleansing, like taking a shower at the end of a long day.

    I took notes throughout the book, for personal reference. Here is a slice:

    * Our minds are
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  • Philippe

    Recently I had a 'moment of truth'. We switched houses after almost 25 years at the same place. We knew the whole operation was going to be a challenge because of the thousands of books that had accumulated in that period. However, it turned out the books were easy enough. What really got to us was the thick layer of debris upon which our daily lives had been pullulating. Partly things that had some measure of utility, partly obsolete stuff we had forgotten about and had no connection with at al ...more

  • Darwin8u

    “Minimalism is built around the idea that there’s nothing that you’re lacking.”

    ― Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism



    I wasn't a fan of the writing. Perhaps, I went in expecting more of a Zen minimalism asthetic. Perhaps, I am just comparing it to other design/living books that seemed to resonate better (S, M, L, XL, A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder, Wabi-Sabi: For Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers, etc.). By the end of the book, it all just
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  • Kris

    "For a minimalist, the objective isn't to reduce, it's to eliminate distractions so they can focus on the things that are truly important."

    17. Organizing is not minimizing.

    24. Let go of the idea of getting your money’s worth.

    31. Think of stores as your personal warehouses.

    43. What if you started from scratch?

    34. If you lost it, would you buy it again?

    19. Leave your unused space empty.

    45. Discard anything that creates visual noise.

    +. Question the conventional way you’re supposed to use things.

    +.
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  • Paul Secor

    Some thoughts on Goodbye, Things:

    Mr. Sasaki writes about minimalism in maximalist manner. A good editor could have cut this book down to the length of a magazine article, added a few of the book's photographs, and nothing much would have been lost. In fact, the book could have almost been condensed to the "55 tips to help you say goodbye to your things" on the last few pages of the book. That would have been true minimalism. But then, Mr. Sasaki wouldn't have had a book to sell.

    Mr. Sasaki writes
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  • Gattalucy

    Non l'ho finito: l'ho buttato! Se devo far spazio nella mia vita liberandomi di cose superflue, questo libro è stato il primo esempio.