Read Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki Online

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism

Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert; hes just a regular guy who was stressed at work, insecure, and constantly comparing himself to othersuntil one day he decided to change his life by reducing his possessions to the bare minimum. The benefits were instantaneous and absolutely remarkable: without all his stuff, Sasaki finally felt true freedom, peace of mind, and appreciation for the present moment.Goodbye, Things explores why we measure our worth by the things we own and how the new minimalist movement will not only transform your space but truly enrich your life. Along the way, Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering tips on the minimizing process and revealing the profound ways he has changed since he got rid of everything he didnt need. The benefits of a minimalist life can be realized by anyone, and Sasakis humble vision of true happiness will open your eyes to minimalisms potential....

Title : Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780393609035
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 288 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism Reviews

  • lauren

    I hate-read this book for fun. I don't aspire to minimalism, but I would like to get rid of a lot of the stuff in my life. I got a bit out of reading the Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up, and was expecting more along those lines. This book however made Marie Kondo seem like a very reasonable person, and her idea of what to have in your home cozy and comfortable by comparison. The minimalism advocated for in this book is stark and lifeless. A photo of the ideal room was literally an empty room. ...more

  • Philippe

    Recently I had a 'moment of truth'. We switched houses after almost 25 years at the same place. We knew the whole operation was going to be a challenge because of the thousands of books that had accumulated in that period. However, it turned out the books were easy enough. What really got to us was the thick layer of debris upon which our daily lives had been pullulating. Partly things that had some measure of utility, partly obsolete stuff we had forgotten about and had no connection with at al ...more

  • Ksenia

    I've read this book in Norwegian. The English version is not available just yet, so I chose to read in Norwegian.

    It can be divided in two parts: useful and not useful. Tips are okay and interesting and rewarding to follow. As a minimalist myself, I have already tried a lot of things listed in the book. An author, however, goes to extreme version of minimalistic approach to life, trying to persuade us to come with him. Someone might find it okay, someone might be taken aback.

    To be honest, the w
    ...more

  • Nguyễn Quang Vũ

    Đầu tiên phải nói về cái Tít. Quyển này có tên tiếng Nhựt Bổn là: "ぼくたちに、もうモノは必要ない。 断捨離からミニマリストへ". Đương nhiên là tớ copy paste chứ hiểu chết liền luôn nếu không có thằng Google Translate. Ý cái Tít là: Không cần cái gì nữa, tối giản đi mà sống ... Đại khái thế. Xuất bản bằng tiếng Anh thì nó tên là "Goodbye, Things: On Minimalist Living". Nói chung là không có chữ nào liên quan đến việc cả nước Nhật sống như thế cả. Cơ mà dân nhà mình xính ngoại. Kiểu làm dạy con làm giàu thì học người Do Thái ...more

  • Kathryn

    Fumio Sasaki takes minimalism to an entirely new level. I could not live in such a fundamental environment. I need beauty and plant life; my home is my sanctuary, not just a place to sleep. This lifestyle works for him and others, I am sure, but just not for me. I much prefer William Morris's quote "Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."

  • Joseph

    Picked this up as a $1.99 audible book.

    I have been a minimalist so sorts for quite a while. In the Marines I could pack up everything I owned into two sea bags. Married, a kid, college (books) and I kind of lost it. Now with a life I could pack into a midsize hatchback (with a bike rack) I am back.

    Sasaki can physically pack up his life and move in 30 minutes. I can’t. He lives in a 200 square meter apartment. I like going to Ikea and have imagined I could be happy in one of their display micro
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  • Paul A.

    The sections "The 55 tips to help you say goodbye to your things" and "the 15 more tips for the next stage of your minimalist journey" were worth the price of admission.

    The "before" and "after" pictures were a nice touch.

    The only reason I gave it four stars instead of five is because it could have been tighter; the book could have have benefited from a stricter edit. His explanation of what is essentially hedonic adaptation (in the section called "Why do we accumulate so much in the first place?
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  • Kris

    "For a minimalist, the objective isn't to reduce, it's to eliminate distractions so they can focus on the things that are truly important."

    17. Organizing is not minimizing.

    24. Let go of the idea of getting your money’s worth.

    31. Think of stores as your personal warehouses.

    43. What if you started from scratch?

    34. If you lost it, would you buy it again?

    19. Leave your unused space empty.

    45. Discard anything that creates visual noise.

    +. Question the conventional way you’re supposed to use things.

    +.
    ...more