Read Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki Online

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism

Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert; hes just a regular guy who was stressed at work, insecure, and constantly comparing himself to othersuntil one day he decided to change his life by reducing his possessions to the bare minimum. The benefits were instantaneous and absolutely remarkable: without all his stuff, Sasaki finally felt true freedom, peace of mind, and appreciation for the present moment.Goodbye, Things explores why we measure our worth by the things we own and how the new minimalist movement will not only transform your space but truly enrich your life. Along the way, Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering tips on the minimizing process and revealing the profound ways he has changed since he got rid of everything he didnt need. The benefits of a minimalist life can be realized by anyone, and Sasakis humble vision of true happiness will open your eyes to minimalisms potential....

Title : Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780393609035
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 288 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism Reviews

  • lauren

    I hate-read this book for fun. I don't aspire to minimalism, but I would like to get rid of a lot of the stuff in my life. I got a bit out of reading the Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up, and was expecting more along those lines. This book however made Marie Kondo seem like a very reasonable person, and her idea of what to have in your home cozy and comfortable by comparison. The minimalism advocated for in this book is stark and lifeless. A photo of the ideal room was literally an empty room. ...more

  • Trừng Duyên

    Ơ hay lắm, không thất vọng xíu nào luôn. Trước đây cứ mỗi lần chuyển phòng là phải 20 chuyến xe máy dù cách nhau có 1-2 cây số. Thế mới thấy nhục.

    Nhiều lần có ý định chuyển nhà mà do đống đồ nên ngại cực. Thôi, khi nào đi học kiểu gì cũng bán sạch để sống cho thoải mái. Hồi nhỏ cũng thần tượng lắm kiểu sống cả tuần mặc mỗi 1 cái áo của anh Mark hay trong Noblesse, mà thật ra mình cũng xài rất ít quần áo, thế mà chẳng hiểu sao áo quần cứ chất đống lên trong phòng, khiến cái phòng 15m2 không có m
    ...more

  • Cody

    Tyler Durden: You're not your job. You're not how much money you have in the bank. You're not the car you drive. You're not the contents of your wallet. You're not your f*cking khakis.

    The first time I watched "Fight Club" in my late teens it presented a sort of resolution and relief to my own ideas of material possession. I imagine it's worse now for teenagers, with the latest iPhone, Xbox, or other self-indulgent gadget on the market, combined with the need for social media expression. Goodbye
    ...more

  • Emma Sea

    Sasaki's "new Japanese minimalism" relies on a) living in a 24-hour metropolis so you can go out to buy something at 2am at an all-night store if you urgently need something b) a culture that offers rentable suitcases and c) steady, reliable full-time work with sufficient disposable income so you can afford to rent a suitcase, or buy anything you can't rent, which you will give away or sell (at a large loss) whenever you are done with it. Also being a 35-year-old single man helps.

    But in amongst
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  • Kris

    "For a minimalist, the objective isn't to reduce, it's to eliminate distractions so they can focus on the things that are truly important."

    17. Organizing is not minimizing.

    24. Let go of the idea of getting your money’s worth.

    31. Think of stores as your personal warehouses.

    43. What if you started from scratch?

    34. If you lost it, would you buy it again?

    19. Leave your unused space empty.

    45. Discard anything that creates visual noise.

    +. Question the conventional way you’re supposed to use things.

    +.
    ...more

  • Joseph

    Picked this up as a $1.99 audible book.

    I have been a minimalist so sorts for quite a while. In the Marines I could pack up everything I owned into two sea bags. Married, a kid, college (books) and I kind of lost it. Now with a life I could pack into a midsize hatchback (with a bike rack) I am back.

    Sasaki can physically pack up his life and move in 30 minutes. I can’t. He lives in a 200 square meter apartment. I like going to Ikea and have imagined I could be happy in one of their display micro
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  • Lisa

    Such a good book. This is not just about minimizing. It's about changing your whole mind frame about your stuff and stuff in general. You can also replace the word "stuff" for the word "life" in that last sentence. Since this is a book about minimalism, I don't want to be too wordy. I just want to say that I agree with Sasaki-san that we should throw out all the superfluous stuff, and it's all superfluous stuff. 5 stars.

  • Darwin8u

    “Minimalism is built around the idea that there’s nothing that you’re lacking.”

    ― Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism



    I wasn't a fan of the writing. Perhaps, I went in expecting more of a Zen minimalism asthetic. Perhaps, I am just comparing it to other design/living books that seemed to resonate better (S, M, L, XL, A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder, Wabi-Sabi: For Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers, etc.). By the end of the book, it all just
    ...more