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Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, the Osage rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.Then, one by one, they began to be killed off. One Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, watched as her family was murdered. Her older sister was shot. Her mother was then slowly poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more Osage began to die under mysterious circumstances.In this last remnant of the Wild Westwhere oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes such as Al Spencer, the Phantom Terror, roamed virtually anyone who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll surpassed more than twenty-four Osage, the newly created F.B.I. took up the case, in what became one of the organizations first major homicide investigations. But the bureau was then notoriously corrupt and initially ...

Title : Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI
Author :
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ISBN : 9780385534253
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 359 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI Reviews

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    David Grann, a journalist, has done an excellent job investigating and chronicling the terrible story of the Osage American Indian murders in the 1920s. It's a chilling story - hard to believe it's true, hard to believe people could be so cruel and callous. Hard to believe I've never heard of this before.

    In about 1904, the Osage tribe had negotiated a contract with the U.S. government; tellingly, their lawyer was able to slip in a clause that all oil, gas and other mineral rights on their land w

    "To believe that the Osages survived intact from their ordeal is a delusion of the mind. What has been possible to salvage has been saved and is dearer to our hearts because it survived. What is gone is treasured because it was what we once were. We gather our past and present into the depths of our being and face tomorrow. We are still Osage."
    Initial post: I've borrowed this from a friend for a December book club read. She says it's due back at the library in 5 days. *cracks knuckles* No sweat, right?

    P.S. I read it in just two days - it was that gripping. ...more

  • Diane S ☔

    I don't know why or even how, after all I have read, I can still be surprised at man's cunning and greed. I knew nothing about the Osage Indians, certainly nothing about headrights that provided them with a great deal of money.It is the money and the way the law was provisioned that made them a target for the unscrupulous and there were plenty of those.

    This is the story of the investigation into murders that until Hoover involved himself and his men, we're virtually shoved under the rug and goi
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  • LeAnne

    EDITED UPDATE: I recently saw that the works of Laura Ingalls wilder have now been put on some sort of list of controversial books. Because she and her books are mentioned here in this nonfictional account, I wonder if that had something to do with it. I mean really, when was the last time you had someone bring up Laura Ingalls Wilder as semi-racist? Pretty ridiculous.

    ORIGINAL REVIEW:

    Okay, think right now about your neighborhood or your apartment complex. Consider your various neighbors and that
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  • William2

    The depiction of human venality here will set your hair on fire. The Osage Indians, whose reservation happened to be on a major oil reserve, were in the 1920s set upon by an army of white grifters who murdered them for their wealth. And the entire white institutional infrastructure in and around Osage County, Oklahoma—lawyers, bankers, judges, retailers, housewives et al.—were complicit in the killing. The book is an object lesson in concise storytelling. It contains nothing superfluous. It’s a ...more

  • L.A. Starks

    Everyone should read this book.

    I grew up in the county next to Osage, bought the book at an indie bookstore nearby when Grann was on his tour, and have researched Oklahoma history. So I am more familiar than most with the Osage saga, having heard the general stories.

    However, Grann has done a phenomenal job of researching as many of the Osage murders as possible (twenty-four are documented but there appear to have been far more), and of giving a picture of the ongoing predation to which the Osag
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  • JanB



    The blurb: “In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, the Osage rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe….Then, one by one, they began to be killed off. The newly created F.B.I. took up the case, in what became one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations.”

    This book surpasses any fictional murder mystery – the fact th
    ...more

  • Linda

    "We Indians cannot get our rights in these courts and I have no chance at all of saving this land for my children." (Widow of Joe Bates, Osage Nation, 1921)

    No horror novella could possibly mirror the horrendous crimes that were visited upon the Osage Indian Nation in the 1920's. The catastrophic bungling of crime evidence, the leaks and sabotage, and the willful insidious behavior by unscrupulous individuals is mind-boggling. The devil and his cohorts wore well-pressed suits and walked among the
    ...more

  • Matthew

    3 to 3.5 stars

    Interesting and eye opening. A scary true story of greed and racism in the development of the American West. This is one of those hard to read and accept truths of American history. If you enjoy history and/or true crime I think this is worth giving a go.

    My main criticism is that while the story is interesting, I am not quite sure it is book worthy. It seems like this whole story could have been told in 30 to 50 pages or in a Wikipedia article. It feels a bit drawn out when expande
    ...more