Read Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear by Elizabeth Gilbert Online

Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear

Readers of all ages and walks of life have drawn inspiration and empowerment from Elizabeth Gilberts books for years. Now this beloved author digs deep into her own generative process to share her wisdom and unique perspective about creativity. With profound empathy and radiant generosity, she offers potent insights into the mysterious nature of inspiration. She asks us to embrace our curiosity and let go of needless suffering. She shows us how to tackle what we most love, and how to face down what we most fear. She discusses the attitudes, approaches, and habits we need in order to live our most creative lives. Balancing between soulful spirituality and cheerful pragmatism, Gilbert encourages us to uncover the strange jewels that are hidden within each of us. Whether we are looking to write a book, make art, find new ways to address challenges in our work, embark on a dream long deferred, or simply infuse our everyday lives with more mindfulness and passion, Big Magic cracks open a wo...

Title : Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781594634710
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 288 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear Reviews

  • Whitney Atkinson

    I know this has mixed reviews but I didn't mind it! It's not my new bible or anything but it was definitely a kick to the booty to get going on all the story ideas I have. This touches on important topics about staying humble as an author, writing for the right reasons, persevering, and forming ideas. Although this applies to all creativity, I felt especially attached to this as a writer because she is also a writer.

    A debated topic in this book is that Gilbert encourages people not to go to art
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  • Ariel

    I appreciate and respect Elizabeth Gilbert's attempt to inspire creativity, and can fully see why people could love this and take a lot away from it.. but there were too many fundamental things that I disagreed with/thought were done poorly for me.

    1) Creativity as a type of religion: I don't know if "religion" is the right word here, but Gilbert's spiritualization of creativity is saturated in this book. She talks about our need to think of creativity as a spiritual entity, to believe that ideas
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  • Katie

    Although I didn't connect with everything in this book, overall I found it really inspiring and enjoyed it greatly!

  • Irena

    I was in a reading slump, and no fictional novel helped.

    No matter how many times I grabbed a book that sounded interesting, even my to-be-reviewed pile didn't help. In matter of fact, it just got things worse, because everytime I looked at it, I felt like not wanting to read. Period.

    That's when I grabbed Big Magic.

    And it worked, in a way...

    I would probably read it in one day, if I didn't start it in the evening.

    But... as soon as I finished it, my reading slump came back.

    So I guess this book is m
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  • Jenny (Reading Envy)

    I received a copy of this from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

    I have enjoyed Elizabeth Gilbert's TED talks on creativity, more than her books, so I was happy to see her write a book on the topic she seems to think about a lot. Within this book itself she admits that she is writing it in order to explore what she thinks about creativity.

    The book seems to be similar to one of those gift books you get when you graduate with highschool, with motivational quotes and pictures, those b
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  • Rebecca

    With her new book, Gilbert sets herself up as a layman’s creativity guru much like Anne Lamott does with Bird by Bird or Stephen King with On Writing. This is based on Gilbert’s TED talks, and it reads very much like a self-help pep talk, with short chapters, lots of anecdotes, and buzz words to latch onto.

    Here’s a taste of some of Gilbert’s main ideas:

    • Forget about entitlement; “You do not need anybody’s permission to live a creative life.”

    • Authenticity is better than originality; after all

    “Ideas are a disembodied, energetic life-form. They are completely separate from us, but capable of interacting with us—albeit strangely. Ideas have no material body, but they do have consciousness, and they most certainly have will. Ideas are driven by a single impulse: to be made manifest.”


    She illustrates this hypothesis with a story about a book project she abandoned after Eat, Pray, Love. Her idea was for a novel about a woman who travels from Minnesota to Amazonian Brazil to join an entrepreneurial scheme and ends up falling for her boss. Wrapped up in her now-husband’s immigration saga and the writing of Committed, Gilbert left the idea alone for two years and it withered...only to turn up as Ann Patchett’s State of Wonder. Gilbert seems to literally believe that her idea migrated to her new friend. Hmm...

    At any rate, this is definitely inspirational stuff, if not exactly groundbreaking. “Do whatever brings you to life, then. Follow your own fascinations, obsessions, and compulsions. Trust them. Create whatever causes a revolution in your heart. The rest of it will take care of itself.” ...more

  • da AL

    This & 'The Signature of All Things' are my fave Gilbert books. As the audiobook reader in addition to writer, she does an incredible job of sounding polished, relaxed, & truly encouraging. Read or listen to the end for the 2 best of all her great annecdotes.

  • Elyse Walters

    The message is...."we are all inherently creative".

    Elizabeth Gilbert says..."Be an artist. Create for the sake of creating".

    "Because creative living is where the Big Magic will always be".

    And we paid money for this enlightening information. It's kinda funny to me... how

    such an average book, by an average writer, ( acknowledges herself that her ideas

    won't resonate with everyone), is such a huge success ---and by that I mean 'money-in-the-bank'. She doesn't have to practice what she preaches.
    ...more