Read Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen Online

Pride and Prejudice

Since its immediate success in 1813, Pride and Prejudice has remained one of the most popular novels in the English language. Jane Austen called this brilliant work "her own darling child" and its vivacious heroine, Elizabeth Bennet, "as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print." The romantic clash between the opinionated Elizabeth and her proud beau, Mr. Darcy, is a splendid performance of civilized sparring. And Jane Austen's radiant wit sparkles as her characters dance a delicate quadrille of flirtation and intrigue, making this book the most superb comedy of manners of Regency England....

Title : Pride and Prejudice
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780679783268
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 279 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Pride and Prejudice Reviews

  • Ana

    “We are all fools in love.”



    Why have I not read this sooner?

    I must admit, I didn't initially understand all the fuss surrounding this novel. I did not understand why so many millions of readers love it. It seemed to me they were all a bunch of romantic fools. Now that I am 'one of them', I can report back that the Pride and Prejudice fandom is actually full of normal people who care passionately about the characters.

    I instantly fell in love with the story and its amazing characters. Marvellous
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  • Zoë

    THIS BOOK IS MY JAM. JANE AUSTEN IS MY JAM. I LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT HER AND THIS BOOK. READ THIS BOOK. THAT IS ALL.

  • Lizzy

    Just a few words to express how I loved Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. So much has already been said, that I feel almost redundant.

    'Pride and Prejudice' for me is above all about women’s choices in marriage, or the possibility of love versus choosing for money or social position. During Austen's time, marriage was the only option a woman had, except if she was rich enough to disregard the expectations of society; except if she was willing to live as a poor relation, which usually meant bein

    ”If I can but see one of my daughters happily settled at Netherfield,” said Mrs. Bennet to her husband, “and all the others equally well married, I shall have nothing to wish for.”


    But we have to remember that woman’s necessity was not one-sided:

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.


    But, alas, that has probably been said before. What else can I mention here? That Jane Austen was ahead of her time, and her heroine, the witty and charming Elizabeth Bennet, makes us fall in love with her by her accurate view of the world:

    There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.


    And let’s not forget Mr. Darcy, for I am a romantic at heart, and he conquered me with his truthful statement, and even more crucial for me, ended up changing for Elizabeth:

    In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.


    What I most liked about Elizabeth and Darcy’s relationship is that it is not a simple romantic tale, but I loved how they overcome his pride and her prejudice and grow up gradually from a mutual antipathy to an understanding. And that does not happen overnight but over a period of over a year.

    All this, and much more if I wished to be even more redundant is what makes this novel so popular and enduring. It was refreshing to have a story that despite questioning prevailing values makes us smile. Highly recommended.

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  • karen

    it is official: now everyone on the planet has read this book. i was the last holdout, and being the last person (excluding those who are just being born...... now) i am sorry i didn't like it more. i knew going into it that i was not a jane austen girl; i had read two others and thought them bloodless and mercantile. but everyone said to me, "well, you haven't read pride and prejudice is why you don't like her." which i thought might be valid. but it's not. because i still don't care. this is n ...more

  • Rosianna

    I'm a great believer in the idea that if anyone didn't like this book it's because they didn't read it properly and/or are possessed. In all seriousness, the wit is timeless and Austen should always be remembered as a literary genius, as I hope she will.

  • Jasmin

    "I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look, or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that it had begun."

    This was Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy's reply when Ms. Elizabeth Bennet asked him when he fell in love with her.

    Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen had put my left out dictionary into good use. I have to admit, I was very slow in the first pages, however, nearing the end, I was like a driver going at 100mph, eager to reach the finish lin
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  • Paul Bryant

    Revived review to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the death of Jane Austen. Go Jane - like a cute little tortoise you have outlasted all of those bustling hares.

    ****

    It is a truth which I would like to see universally acknowledged, that no one voluntarily reads any 19th century novels unless they are by Jane Austen. I fear that modern readers think all these Radcliffes, Disraelis, Eliots, Gissings and so forth tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt them, or even, that they are most disagr
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  • Bookdragon Sean

    Society, with all its restrictive constructs, is one nasty piece of work.

    It comes with so many silly rules, so many silly expectations. Those of social station and wealth must be seen to marry someone of the same “worth” regardless of the feelings involved; they must be seen to marry someone on their level of class structure. But what of love? What of passion? Should it be quenched because of these all-encompassing silly constructs?

    Austen doesn’t think so.

    Enter Darcy, a man who is royally pis
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