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Sense and Sensibility

'The more I know of the world, the more am I convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!'Marianne Dashwood wears her heart on her sleeve, and when she falls in love with the dashing but unsuitable John Willoughby she ignores her sister Elinor's warning that her impulsive behaviour leaves her open to gossip and innuendo. Meanwhile Elinor, always sensitive to social convention, is struggling to conceal her own romantic disappointment, even from those closest to her. Through their parallel experience of loveand its threatened lossthe sisters learn that sense must mix with sensibility if they are to find personal happiness in a society where status and money govern the rules of love.This edition includes explanatory notes, textual variants between the first and second editions, and Tony Tanner's introduction to the original Penguin Classic edition....

Title : Sense and Sensibility
Author :
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ISBN : 9780141439662
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 409 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Sense and Sensibility Reviews

  • Henry Avila

    The story of two teenage girls with romantic troubles, caused by unreliable men (they have dark secrets, but who doesn't ? ), in 1790's England, calm Elinor Dashwood 19, and her younger sibling , by a couple of years, the emotional, Marianne, 17. When their father is no longer living, all the family, including the mother, Mrs. Dashwood and third sister, Margaret, 13, must vacate their mansion, in Sussex, Norland Park, a large estate, which many generations of the quiet, respectable Dashwoods, ha ...more

  • Barry Pierce

    Sense and Sensibility is dense with inactivity.

  • C.

    I wish Jane Austen could see she became an admired literary standard. She conjures such scholarly connotations, I was wary of enjoying “Sense And Sensibility”. I hope my words attain quality that is discussed and absorbed for meaning but books are about the story, personages, message, setting, and sympathizing with them. I couldn't care less about structural intentions, like “symbolism”, thus my reviews are never going to be critical essay types. Just as a novel, I am thrilled to report I liked ...more

  • s.penkevich

    'Know your own happiness. Want for nothing but patience -- or give it a more fascinating name: Call it hope.'

    What does it mean for one to be 'sensible'? As we are all individuals, with our own needs, is it sensible to always act according to our countenance (to steal a lovely phrase from Austen), to keep true to ourselves, or is there a code of manners that we should adhere to in order to maintain a proper course of action? Austen’s aptly titled Sense and Sensibility, a staggeringly impressive f
    ...more

  • Maria Clara

    ¿Qué puedo decir? Jane Austen siempre será la maravillosa Jane Austen, y esta historia, como todas las que he leído de ella, me ha encantado. Sin embargo, me ha faltado un poquito más de romance.

  • Jason Koivu



    Call me Elinor.

    Being the older sibling, while growing up I often felt like I was shoved into the role of being the sensible one, the reasonable one, the responsible one. That is how I was seen. That is what people believed of me. Underneath the skin of the rational, reserved tut-tutter writhed an often non-sensical, unreasonable, irresponsible being. But it took the occurrence of extreme circumstances for others to see it.

    Such is the life of Elinor Dashwood, the elder sister in a small, displac
    ...more

  • Eric Althoff

    Hmmm, how to critique one of the most revered writers of romance literature? Now, before all of your Jane-ites get on my case for being unromantic or whatever, let me say only that unfortuantely, I read "Persuasion," Austen's last novel, and found it to be one of the best books I've ever read. Now having read "Sense and Sensibility," I will say that it truly doese feel like a first novel, as if the author was still trying to find her voice. So I've done the bookends of Austen, much like a concer ...more

  • Madeline

    I hate romantic comedies.

    I hate them for a wide variety of reasons - I hate their formulaic plots, their repeated character tropes that never seem to change (hmm, will this one have a sassy best friend who only exists to dispense advice?), I hate their consistent failing of the the Bechdel test, and I hate the way they try to make me believe that a skinny and gorgeous woman is incapable of finding a man because she's clumsy or has a job or something.

    But mostly, I hate them because their plots
    ...more